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pagoda

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Everything posted by pagoda

  1. No problem with the delay. Thanks so much for keeping us informed about the maintenance! I really appreciate it and will forward the new dates on to my clients. Cheers, Patrick
  2. pagoda

    Paranoid

    Follow-up: I'll still be needing those mental health numbers please. As it turns out, http://moni.tor.us is a website that monitors the uptime for ones websites. Since the URL was showing up as http://trackmon.itor.us and not http://moni.tor.us I did not recognize it (and besides, they changed their domain name to . I did in fact insert that code, but apparently committed a typo when I wrote it (or else that is an alternative website they used to use). Nonetheless, short story long is this this: It is a website I used to use and still use for their remote monitoring products. I end
  3. Greetings All! I'm tending towards the paranoid side today, so someone needs to talk me down about this (please ). I was editing my very old (2 years old) main business website today. I'm working on bringing it into the modern age. In the process, I came across the following code: ><script src="http://trackmon.itor.us/res/mon_analytics.php?v=1" type="text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> monitorus_account_number ="{NINE_DIGIT_ACCOUNT_NUMBER}"; start_mon_counter(); </script> Where the {NINE_DIGIT_ACCOUNT_CODE} was just a nu
  4. trop P.S. This word is French and means "too; too much or too many", but has been anglicized. One common (anglicized) use of the word is when combined with the French "de" (meaning "of") into de trop which is another anglicized phrase with the following definitions: de trop (adj.): too much; too many in the way; not wanted being excessive or unreasonable superfluous Thus, an example use of this anglicized phrase might be: For a simple Scrabble-like game, his de trop entry, like so many others he had posted, was boring, silly, overly thought out and simply over the
  5. Dang it! I always knew it was true! Oh well, guess my wife was right about this at least! It was hard to do this quiz while that little hamster in my head was trying to figure out how to use my preppy mind powers to do evil sexual deeds to other Firefox users who happen to live in Germany.... Bwaaa Haaaa Haaaaa!!! Pagoda (Er... I guess I should have said "Damn it! I always knew it was true..." in keeping with my true nature...)
  6. pagoda

    Scrabble II

    salty BTW: Look at posts #504 and #505... Is it me (well, regardless of the answer... yes, it is me, either I'm obsessive compulsive and just a stickler, or else clueless), or... given the rules: How about this: I'll start with a word. The next person can either: 1. Rearrage the letters, -or- 2. Change exactly one of the letters, -or- 3. Both (rearrange -AND- change exactly one letter). How does one go from w a t c h => t w i c e? I mean, if it's me, please excuse my lack of insight (I've been off the boards for a while, so I'm maybe rusty...) If it was Bob, then... Hey
  7. WHAAAAA HAAA HAAAAA Help.... help... my sides hurt....
  8. Personally, I would just use the Windows variant of the Linux/Unix "rsync" command and selectively copy only the .JPG (or whatever files you wanted) to a new locale and retain the directory structure. After all - in some sense - who cares if the directory structure is mirrored? That said, if you do care, you case still use the Window rsync solution, then use a batch renaming script on the resulting directory tree created by rsync that contains only the files of the type you have specified (in this case, .JPGs, or whatever). (Edit to post: Whoops - above paragraph should say, in essen
  9. The first image - with all the yellow cables - appears to be the back of a supercomputer. I used to build "commodity component supercomputers", also called "Beowulf-class" supercomputers. The concept is that you buy a bunch of regular old PCs and hook them all up - at a fraction of the cost of a custom built supercomputer. The biggest one we built was made of 300 shuttle boxes called the "Space Simulator" at Los Alamos National Laboratory. (For those interested: http://space-simulator.lanl.gov/ ). When it was built it cost around $500,000 and was the 87th fastest machine in the world - an
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