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I was reading about this yesterday and like the gmail space, alarms went off in my head again. Why would I want my files somewhere else? Why would I want them somewhere where a hacker can get access to them and I have no control?

 

And with the current legal problems with the government wanting access to all the searches we've done, now they will get access to the files I have...withOUT me giving them permission.

 

Nah, I'll keep my stuff over here and they can come to the front door with a warrant if they need to snoop around for anything.

 

Not that I have anything illegal, its just my right to keep MY STUFF private :D

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I agree with you guys.

I do wish there was a way to mirror my hard dirve on an offsite location though. Perhaps I am a little over zelous, but I would hate to loose things like my photos in something like a flood, huricaine, or even a fire.

 

I use SyncBack to backup my files and move them to a second drive, all of that is on my local network though. While most causes for loss is user error, and my methods help protect against that, it doesnt protect against the above disasters.

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I agree with you guys.

I do wish there was a way to mirror my hard dirve on an offsite location though.

There are, but you gotta pay. One they have been advertising on the radio a lot is enveloc.com

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I do wish there was a way to mirror my hard dirve on an offsite location though.

 

Like Jim mentioned there are companies that will do this for you...for a price. Or there are other creative ways which would be cheaper. You can use a cheap external Hard Drive and burn a backup image to it. Then you would need a relative in a remote location to agree to hold the drive for you until you need it back. If they are close enough you could drive it over or mail it. Or you could rent a safe deposit box in another city to store it. Or you could burn to DVD's and store them.

 

The good thing about this route is the data security is controlled by you, not by Google.

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In another forum I frequent I saw a post by a guy who has a dedicated server in Texas and he wants to get another server in Europe for backup. What doomsday scenario is he preparing for?

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In another forum I frequent I saw a post by a guy who has a dedicated server in Texas and he wants to get another server in Europe for backup. What doomsday scenario is he preparing for?

 

Texas is going to self-destruct! Sorry Dick...

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

best personal data backup soution, USB all your stuff and backup any important data on a CD/DVD and get oen of them "safe boxes"

(cash box)

 

some developer did make a "g-drive" thing so gmail would act as space to store files (if you had this app and were logged in) but the hacker/spyware alarm went off for me

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Forget backing up your entire hard drive for all the security reasons you can imagine.

 

However, there is no cost effective and guaranteed method for archiving for the very-long-term, such has how do I save hundreds of gigs of photos and videos for my grandkids and their grandkids. Hard drives fail and, if you research the issue, you cannot rely on CD/DVDs. However, giving your photos/videos to Google to archive for free or nearly free and let them worry about replacing and updating redundant hard drives is the answer to very-long-term data storage. Count me in!!!

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...giving your photos/videos to Google to archive for free or nearly free and let them worry about replacing and updating redundant hard drives is the answer to very-long-term data storage. Count me in!!!

 

Guess that depends how much you trust a free service to store your data forever and ever and ever without either losing it, cancelling the service, charging for the service, or turning your data over to inquiring government agencies. How accountable can you really hold Google if something does go wrong? Usually, if it's too good to be true, it is.

 

A mix of encrypted network attached storage with regular encrypted CD and DVD backups stored offsite have worked for me for some time.

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Hmmmm...the paranoid schizo in me says kinda the same thing. But what it really boils down to is your definition of the terms "valuable data". Living where I live (hurricane alley), I've started saving my pictures and other important documents that I can scan to disk and will be making periodic updates. While I like the idea of convenience, it just sounds too easy for this data to fall into the wrong hands. I'll do my own.

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Im kinda with DWD on this. I would sure like to be able to back up my photos.

 

There is a local company here in utah that will allow you to upload your photos to their site (from there you can order prints and stuff like that). They keep your photos for you as a back up. They allow 3gig I think and they back everything up to tape on a regular basis and keep it in a vault in the granite mountains. I thought it was a sexy idea, just wasnt executed very well in my opinion.

 

I would however need to filter out all of my pics with me in my undies :)

Can't have those getting out. I might want to run for President.

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Guess that depends how much you trust a free service to store your data forever and ever and ever without either losing it, cancelling the service, charging for the service, or turning your data over to inquiring government agencies. How accountable can you really hold Google if something does go wrong? Usually, if it's too good to be true, it is.

 

A mix of encrypted network attached storage with regular encrypted CD and DVD backups stored offsite have worked for me for some time.

I trust a service as big as Google to provide sufficient notice before they go out of business, and that they won't loose thousands of my pictures since they seem to do pretty good with my email and I'm not worried about turning my pics and vids over to anyone (it's all boring stuff). Google would be in addition to my CD/DVD backups but, in the long run, I'll bet the pics will last longer on Google's servers than on my off-site plastic disk collection.

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For photos and videos, sure, okay.

 

*TCH-Tim puts on tinfoil hat

 

But as far as the other 82% of my data, the more control I have the better. I'm just not that trusting.

 

To each his own though.

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But I think that submitting a video to Google Video is inherently different than using Google's G-drive.

 

I expect that files uploaded to Google Video are temporary in nature. The G-drive thing doesn't sound like that, to me at least. In fact, the privacy police are more concerned that Google WILL store it for a long time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

eith g drive, (the one i ssen works with gmail so it will dump it in one of your mailboxes or make a new hidden folder, ony thing is you need the software on the actualy pc, and if you wanna back your photos up, TCH is here, i gallery all of mine on here (the ones i like, and want others to see) , and regularly CD the good ones :)

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Ive used the gmail drive, but have been underwhelmed . I would also love to use TCH for an archive of my photos, and do to an extent I guess with my photo albums, but I have over 4 gigs of pics. A web host just isnt practical for that much storage.

 

As a side note, I have seen talk about microsofts version of the gdrive. It is codenamed live drive. I gotta tell you, I love seeing competition for microsoft. I think it breads nothing more than better products at lower prices. Which I like. :)

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With regard to photo... I have to say this... if you can keep your photos for 100 or 200 years, your great great (x??) grand children may not be able to access them, because the file format now may become inadequate for future use. The problem for them might be finding a way to interpret all the 1's and 0's you left behind.

 

The best way might actually be the good-old human-readable film. Most historic documents are in the human-readable paper and film format that has survived centuries. This is one thing that many archives worry about when they digitize their collection... whether they'll be able to read it in the future.

 

If you still have files generated by very old programs, they may not be readable anymore... or are displayed weirdly. Imagine what'll happen 100-200 years from now. They probably won't have MSWord anymore (after Microsoft declares bankruptcy :P)... and have it replaced by OpenOffice.org (horray! ;)).

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