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leezard

More Bang For Your Buck

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If your like me, you want the most out of the hardware you pay for, well heres a little secret about a certain 1.4Ghz AMD CPU.

 

One of the main differences in a high end CPU's and a low end CPU's is the "wafer" that big square piece that holds all the CPU components. AMD mass produced a 1.4GHz CPU using the wafer for a 2.2Ghz processor. This actually happens a lot due to supply and demand, rather than make new wafers for the XP 1700+ processor that was in higher demand, they used the wafers that were made for the XP 2800+.

 

The trick here is not ALL XP 1700's were made with the XP 2800 wafer, you have to take a look at the stepping codes on the CPU (kind of like a serial number) what your looking for is a stepping code that has JIUHB in it, those 5 letters tell you that you have a entry level CPU built on a top of the line wafer.

 

XP 1700+ (w/JIUHB stepping code) about $50-$60

XP 2800+ $177 on pricewatch.com

 

Ok, so what difference does that make, you have a $50 dollar chip built on a $177 wafer, but when you install it on your motherboard it's still gonna be a 1.4ghz CPU. This is the nice part about this chip, without making any physical modifications to the CPU or motherboard you can safely increase the speed of the CPU to over 2.0Ghz by adjusting your FSB (Front Side Bus) in your BIOS.

 

Most newer motherboards allow FSB and multipier adjustments. CPU speed is determined by FSB X multiplier. So, if you have a FSB of 166 and a multiplier of 10, you have a CPU speed of 1.66Ghz. 166 X 10 = 1660

 

Some of the REALLY new motherboards have built in overclocking tools in the BIOS that raise your FSB and multi one step at a time until the computer will no longer boot, then it steps down one and thats your max stable overclock.

 

Anyway, back to the JIUHB CPU, a new motherboard and an XP 1700 with JIUHB stepping would cost you about $160- $180 but you could get the same performance out of it that you would from an XP 2800 and new motherboard that would cost you $270- $300. Or if you already have a nice motherboard, your out $50 bucks and you have one hell of a nice, powerfull CPU.

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Most excellent.

 

Good job!

 

HE leezard, lets give away some subs to CPU Magazine in your forums.

 

Think of something....

 

Bill

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leezard,

 

Too cool. I will have to be on the lookout for those. The last seroius overclocking was getting my Celeron 300A up to the 500 mark with no extra cooling. I think I should have at the least put a bigger fan on it though as it only lasted about a year. Now I am looking to start getting back into it again. I have 6 case fans so I think I have the case cooling in place and am thinking on going water cooled and pulling my monster TT fan out. I am going to get a kick out of these new forums. Keep em comming. :)

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Hi,

I would like to point out one thing - cooling.

 

For any overclocking ability, you need a fan which is above and beyound your required amount. This was painfully proved to me a few weeks back when I fried a duron 900 in 32 minutes.

 

Actually, another pointer, when overclocking, dont wack it up the full amount. First off, take it up a few notches and let it tun noting the temperature and stability of the machine, when your happy, notch it up some more. When it becomes too hot or too unstable, stop and go back down.

 

Jim

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Jim,

 

I have to agree with you. Just as you can never have too big a hard drive or too much ram everything you can do to keep the heat away will give your computer a better life.

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the cpu I mentioned above, has been overclocked to 2.5ghz on air cooling, older processors like the duron 900 you fried ran VERY hot anyway, without decent cooling it wouldnt take much to fry one.

 

Overclocking via your FSB and multiplier usually doesnt raise your temperatures that much, its when you start adjusting the core voltage that your temps really rise, more voltage = more heat.

 

my XP 1800+ will overclock and run stable as an XP 2100+ with standard air cooling. I dont run it at that speed just because I dont really need to.

 

yes cooling is something you need to consider, but you dont need to run out and buy a watercooling set up if your thinking about overclocking. There are a LOT of awesome air cooling options now, companies like Thermaltake, Thermalright, Zalman etc have made air cooling a science.

 

I do agree with you 100% about not trying to OC all at once, go a step at a time. What I usually do is raise my FSB one step at a time and see if the computer boots, if it does I raise it again. I rinse and repeat until the computer wont boot up, Then I go back to my bios and adjust my memory settings CAS latency etc and try again, if it still doesnt boot I lower my FSB by 1 and reboot. I just keep messing with it until i find the most stable settings.

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Hi,

 

Somehow the idea of running water around my computer turned on has never really got me going. Funny that hehe

 

Jim

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forgot to add another thing, Thermal compound...you know that square patch of white goo thats on most heatsinks. wipe that crap off and put some quality compound on it like Nanotherm Silver XTC, or Artic Silver III.

 

Good thermal compound can make a HUGE difference, if its applied right.

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I dont want to water cool because I need to. I want to do it because i can. I could care less on this machine if I can realy overclock it or not, it's my play machine. I have a machine each for my wife, daughter, and myself as well as my play machine. I use my play machine to learn new tricks with hardware and I have always wanted to answer the question of what do you run with "A water cooled blah blah blah". Heck if I could get it to run submerged in liquid nitrogen I would. Its the one thing I have that I dont care what happens to it as long as I am having fun toying around with it.

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lol, yeah thats why my rig is water cooled......not because it needs it, but because i can ;)

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This report shows several commercial water-cooling systems among other things. I think the coolest is the case with the motherboard submerged in mineral oil, as shown below:

koolance2.jpg

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On 5/30/2003 at 6:27 PM, leezard said:

forgot to add another thing, Thermal compound...you know that square patch of white goo thats on most heatsinks. wipe that crap off and put some quality compound on it like Nanotherm Silver XTC, or Artic Silver III.

 

Good thermal compound can make a HUGE difference, if its applied right.

Yup, sadly too many people ignore this. You also should re-apply the fresh one at lest once a year. If you ask most of the people they have their computer +5 years and have never done it. About the thermal paste or grease... definitely go for high-end stuff. It will make a notable improvements and helps to protect your equipment. Right now Iam experimenting with rather interesting compound. It is called nanodiamond thermal grease (here). Its based on nano-particles so it fills every space even down to nano-level.

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Welcome to the forum Zema.

I removed the link in your post as the thread is nearly 15 years old.

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