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cajunman4life

Encryption Anyone?

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Hey guys, I'm working on a new encryption algorithm (nothing big), and I'd like some input... if you like trying to break codes, have a stab at it. Here's the encrypted text:

 

ad4d68d89ed3420c81ef4d055ee/3bead.2b675661f688b81d2bfa278756c3372952df

 

More information/discussion at:

 

http://www.aaronandsarah.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=26

 

Thanks!

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Alright guys, I've tweaked the algorithm a bit to allow for encryption of much more data than a sentence. Here's the same message I posted before, but run under the new algorithm. More tweaks are on the way however... use the link from the first post to visit my forum and follow along with the progress. Here's the new encrypted code:

 

ad4d68d89ed3420c81ef4d055ee/3e239.2b67A2bccA2c61A7994A116912bfaA277fA164562b85A2f59A4bfAA.F

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I'm not much of a code breaker, and without much to go on I'm just doing standard code breaking practices.

 

Right now I'm assuming some kind of hexadecimal cipher in the original string since all it is is just a series of 0-9/a-f and random /.\.

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I'm not much of a code breaker, and without much to go on I'm just doing standard code breaking practices.

 

Right now I'm assuming some kind of hexadecimal cipher in the original string since all it is is just a series of 0-9/a-f and random /.\.

 

Right and wrong. While it is in hex, it's not necessarily the original string. I'm also working on a "mutation" function so that the same plain text will not produce the same cipher text twice...

 

I'm just curious how solid this really is... I can encrypt a < 20 character sentence in about 15 mins by hand, of course the computer spits it out in the blink of an eye (which is why I started the program last night and finished it early this afternoon). The next thing I'll be working on is reducing the size of the encrypted text.

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The strength of your encryption depends on what methods and trailing evidence you decide to leave in your cipher technique. If you used something like polyalphabetic key ciphering techniques, a cryptanalyst might be able to identify statistical patterns or some other key piece of information, like padded text.

 

Of course, at first I was thinking you might be doing some kind of factoring based encryption a la RSA, till I sorted the strings (attempting to do a statistical analysis) and saw the frequency of hex characters.

 

And of course, you have the advantage of being the encrypter and not the code breaker. :)

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Indeed I have the upper hand. I know how this seemingly random string of hex numbers is built, and without that vital piece of information it's difficult to even know where to begin. While I'm a novice at encryption, I think I've done fairly well (considering my first feeble attempt at encryption came about 5 years ago when I was using a "Rot13" method... lol)

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Admittedly, this method of encryption isn't very efficient. The plain text version of the encrypted text above is a mere 15 character sentence. I'll be working on efficiency (ie much smaller) next.

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I've updated the algorithm a bit, adding a form of "mutation" (basically, the encrypted text in theory will never be "spit out" from the algorithm the exact same). This, in combination with "one-time use keys" make the encryption fairly strong (it should be noted that, mathematically, no encryption method is "unbreakable").

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An example to give you an idea of what I mean. Here is the same message that I have used all along, encrypted, without a "one-time use" key. There are 4 runs through the algorithm, each one producing a different product, and yet they all decrypt perfectly. Here they are:

 

1) 5q3338e2f52f772b674aa82f4f52db8d1a527a33381269qfyd05d68d89ef4ed3p3e1dy4205eead4c81

 

2) 38b81b2b692bfa277f527f2f51ef262b852f774bcgqfyed05p3e1d5q33yed3ad4420d68c81d89ef45e

 

3) 2f59g7995g13c732b67g527fg3338g1269gqfyeed05420ad4d68c81ed3p3e239q2fbdg2c94g2c61g2f77g

ef4d895

 

4) 7991c86f64d22b7152902b674bcgqfy56c3373330b7yc81ef4ed35ee420d68d89ad4d05p3e1d5q2bb7

 

What's probably most frustrating when first looking at these is that each one is of a different length. Anyways, let me know what you guys think.

Edited by cajunman4life

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Alright, since everyone is baffled, the answer is: "This is a test." (minus the quotes, but with the period). Now that you know the plain text, try to get to it from the last 4 cipher texts that I've provided you. See if anyone can discover the methods.

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