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cajunman4life
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Favorite... creating my own. Easier to control how much flexibility and power is needed for a project.

 

I know that's not an option for many, but it came out of a frustration that there were no CMS's that did what I wanted... which is a roundabout answer to your question. Maybe that's changed now that there are several hundred CMS systems to choose from.

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I never tried Geeklog, so I can't say anything about it.

 

And I also agree with surefire, I also created my own CMS when I saw that there was no CMS out there that did exactly what I wanted. But I guess that for some sites, using a pre-existing solution is more than OK, given the quality level that some packages have. :)

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I'd have to say my favourite, and using it at the moment is dragonflycms. it has alot of potential, very customizable, and i just enjoy the feel. it was phpnuke, but rebuilt from the ground up to be very secure, and more flexible..

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I'd have to say my favourite, and using it at the moment is dragonflycms. it has alot of potential, very customizable, and i just enjoy the feel. it was phpnuke, but rebuilt from the ground up to be very secure, and more flexible..

 

I like the looks of dragonflycms, that's one I've examined in the past.

 

But what do programmers do when there really isn't anything that quite suits their every need? They program their own solution (Linus Torvalds anyone?)... even though I've never written anything in php (so I'm a little behind) I'm sure I can pick it up.

Edited by cajunman4life
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I've looked at Mambo, Geeklog, TextPattern, Drupal, and various others for when I was looking into CMS.

 

Drupal is currently my leading choice for resource friendly, modular, well structured CMS. It's a little younger project than some of the others, but it's well supported, seems rather cleanly architected and has a lot of support from it's community going for it. And it's pretty good with resource utilization (unlike a some others like Plone that I looked at that are somewhat resource heavy.... although I do like Plone as well, I definitely wouldn't recommend it for a shared webhosting account, and neither do they).

 

The big thing with CMS's in general, beyond the feature list, is checking the resource requirements. Some just won't work well in a shared hosting environment.

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I've looked at Mambo, Geeklog, TextPattern, Drupal, and various others for when I was looking into CMS.

 

Drupal is currently my leading choice for resource friendly, modular, well structured CMS.  It's a little younger project than some of the others, but it's well supported, seems rather cleanly architected and has a lot of support from it's community going for it.  And it's pretty good with resource utilization (unlike a some others like Plone that I looked at that are somewhat resource heavy.... although I do like Plone as well, I definitely wouldn't recommend it for a shared webhosting account, and neither do they).

 

The big thing with CMS's in general, beyond the feature list, is checking the resource requirements.  Some just won't work well in a shared hosting environment.

 

How right you are Mike... if I was running it off my personal server Mambo wouldn't be a problem lol... shared hosting is another issue. I like Drupal, it's rather clean... decisions decisions.

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well i'd have to say is that i think of a CMS as a shell, or a skeleton. my website looks nothing like dragonflycms's website.. you can customize it to your needs.. i don't know enough about php to create something of my own, so i need to use a cms to get the basics, then tweak and tweak and tweak until i'm happy with the outcome. as for finding the right cms to allow you to get to where you want to get too at the end, i'm not sure.. decisions is right :) good luck though!

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well i'd have to say is that i think of a CMS as a shell, or a skeleton. my website looks nothing like dragonflycms's website.. you can customize it to your needs.. i don't know enough about php to create something of my own, so i need to use a cms to get the basics, then tweak and tweak and tweak until i'm happy with the outcome. as for finding the right cms to allow you to get to where you want to get too at the end, i'm not sure.. decisions is right :) good luck though!

 

Sounds like my blog. I use blogger's service, and have it set to ftp upload my blog entries. I wrote a template that matched 98% of my site design (couldn't get it completely matching and I can't remember why... it looks the same just some functionality is different) and that's the template it uses, so my blog matches perfectly with the rest of my site (now to port the theme to phpbb...). To see exactly what I'm talking about, click the link below (the one that is hosted by TCH) and click blog from the main page.

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And it's pretty good with resource utilization (unlike a some others like Plone that I looked at that are somewhat resource heavy.... although I do like Plone as well, I definitely wouldn't recommend it for a shared webhosting account, and neither do they).

 

The big thing with CMS's in general, beyond the feature list, is checking the resource requirements.  Some just won't work well in a shared hosting environment.

 

I've been playing around with xoops and it fits all my needs. Plus they seem to have good support. That said. Has TCH had problems with websites using xoops?

Is it a big resource hog? What is it that causes different cms to be resource heavy? Is it the amount of querries or ? and how does one go about checking the resource requirements?

 

Lots of ???'s :thumbup1:

 

Thanks

Greg

Edited by OldTimer
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Greg, I don't know about XOOPS' resource usage or if it ever caused problems here at TCH. As for what causes a CMS to be resource intensive, it could be a number of things, like the number of MySQL queries, the ammount of data those queries get/put from/into the database, how the PHP/PERL/whatever code is structured, how the various parts of the CMS were planned to work together, etc, etc...

 

Given all this, the best way you have to find out if a CMS is resource intensive or not is probably by installing those you want to test, run a bunch of stress scripts agains them and keep an eye on server loads.

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Hey, nobody mentioned my favourite: eZ Publish. I like it because its flexibility, has low-level control, multi-language support and versioning.

 

For small and simple sites I sometimes use Mambo, but usually I run into problems if I need more templates and want to control the output of the modules.

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eZ publish is pretty cool, too but both times I tried it, I found it more complex than it should be and it's also slow as hell on my computer, which leads me to think that it wouldn't behave nicely on a shared hosting environment.

 

Those of you who used or still use it, what do you think of it when compared to Drupal, Mambo and the likes?

Edited by borfast
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On MikeJ's recommendation, I am testing Drupal. (Based on your other posts, Mike, I know you know your stuff) It looks like clean code.

 

Here is my primary complaint with CMS systems:

 

I have yet to find a CMS that cleanly and easily wraps the cms template (or skin) around a php/html file that I upload via ftp to the server.

 

For example, let's say I created a simple php page on my desktop using Notepad that just prints out the current date, the user's IP, and a random quote. A pointless script, but just an example. I should be able to ftp it to the site and have it wrapped in the template skin.

 

A CMS should make my life easier, not harder. Forcing me to create all skinnable content within the framework of the web based login is unrealistic and limiting. Many times it's just plain easier to write the php code and upload it.

 

I think it's silly to have to have one template for my CMS and another templating system for the rest of my site, because, let's face it, many times if you want a custom app, you need to create it or download someone else's and upload it to another part of your site. It's not always feasible to create a module that works with the existing CMS functions, classes, and naming conventions.

 

If anyone knows of a CMS that permits this, then I'm all ears. But that's reason numero uno why I opted for 'rolling my own'.

 

I'd be happy to hear that this is a common element of most CMS systems now and I just haven't looked closely enough.

 

(By the way, I know that some CMS systems attempt to incorporate php code and snippets through the use of eval. IMO this isn't a solution. I truly want to be able to hard code a php page and upload it, and have it skinned to match the rest of the site.)

Edited by surefire
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On MikeJ's recommendation, I am testing Drupal.  (Based on your other posts, Mike, I know you know your stuff)  It looks like clean code.

 

Here is my primary complaint with CMS systems:

 

I have yet to find a CMS that cleanly and easily wraps the cms template (or skin) around a php/html file that I upload via ftp to the server.

 

For example, let's say I created a simple php page on my desktop using Notepad that just prints out the current date, the user's IP, and a random quote.  A pointless script, but just an example.  I should be able to ftp it to the site and have it wrapped in the template skin.

 

A CMS should make my life easier, not harder.  Forcing me to create all skinnable content within the framework of the web based login is unrealistic and limiting.  Many times it's just plain easier to write the php code and upload it.

 

I think it's silly to have to have one template for my CMS and another templating system for the rest of my site, because, let's face it, many times if you want a custom app, you need to create it or download someone else's and upload it to another part of your site.  It's not always feasible to create a module that works with the existing CMS functions, classes, and naming conventions.

 

If anyone knows of a CMS that permits this, then I'm all ears.  But that's reason numero uno why I opted for 'rolling my own'.

 

I'd be happy to hear that this is a common element of most CMS systems now and I just haven't looked closely enough.

 

(By the way, I know that some CMS systems attempt to incorporate php code and snippets through the use of eval.  IMO this isn't a solution.  I truly want to be able to hard code a php page and upload it, and have it skinned to match the rest of the site.)

 

Something like this?

http://www.xoops.org/modules/repository/si...cid=94&lid=1123

 

Thanks borfast for the help.

 

Greg

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Yes, that looks like it from the description, but I wouldn't know until I try it. I appreciate the link.

 

I'm not too excited about making the directories world writable

Content Folder 777

Images Folder 777

Admin Folder 777

Inside Admin:

code_ide 777

tmp_ide.htm 777

tmp_ide.php 777

ide.php.conf 777

 

But that seems to be a step in the right direction.

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  • 3 years later...
For those of you out there who use a CMS, what's your favorite and why? I'm experimenting with the idea of using a CMS for a site I'm working on, and I like hearing other people's opinions. So sound off here! Thanks!

 

I just noticed this topic and I'm sure things have changed somewhat since 2005!!

 

Personally I'm a big fan of geeklog as you can see on my blog and I'm currently running a new blog using glfusion cms which is a sort of split off from geeklog. It's easy to install, is fast and has many built in plug-ins such as mediagallery, captcha, forum etc. I know it sounds a bit like advertising but after testing wordpress and Joomla I think Geeklog and glfusion are great CMS's. :tchrocks:

 

However, if blogging is all you do and nothing else I'd go for Wordpress ;)

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