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Setting Up My Own Dns


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At the moment I have a couple of domain names, one run entirely by yourselves on Server 23 which over the last two years has been fantastic. Rock Sign The other just used to link to my home IIS which I used for a simple University project, this is done by using ZoneEdits free DNS services. Now I’m out of University I’ve put it to other uses and decided it would be better to have its own dedicated machine and while I’m there it might as well have its own DNS.

 

I understand most of the principles involved but, what I don’t understand is what I enter into the DNS properties of my domain. The whole idea is to convert the domain name virtual-eye.co.uk to the IP address 82.34.152.54. What I don’t understand is why most DNS servers are at NS1.domainname.com and such, surely that’s complicating things and making the machine have to run two DNS lookups? And how am I meant to set up the DNS for virtual-eye.co.uk and also NS1.virtual-eye.co.uk on the same machine.

 

I’ve looked through a lot of guides and tutorials on DNS but no one explains in enough details, they’re aimed at the curious not someone who is trying to implement it themselves. Mad!!!

 

I’m sure someone here can help me to understand the principle as long as they have the time to write the reply. :hug:

 

Thanks for any help,

Kevin Cooper

 

P.S.

I’m going to be using Windows Server 2003 DNS and IIS.

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I understand most of the principles involved but, what I don’t understand is what I enter into the DNS properties of my domain.  The whole idea is to convert the domain name virtual-eye.co.uk to the IP address 82.34.152.54.  What I don’t understand is why most DNS servers are at NS1.domainname.com and such, surely that’s complicating things and making the machine have to run two DNS lookups?  And how am I meant to set up the DNS for virtual-eye.co.uk and also NS1.virtual-eye.co.uk on the same machine.

I'll try to give you the brief version without getting too confusing.

 

When you create a domain (example.com) and want to host your own name service, there are really two parts to setting that up. First, you have to create the name servers (ns1.example.com and ns2.example.com ... the actual names can be anything you want, it's primarily used for human consumption) and register them. The registering of your name servers is done through your registrar within your domain management interface for the domain (example.com), often called domain host registration or something similar (depends on the registrar). This creates records in the registry for them so that they can be accessed without having to do name lookups to your DNS first. Then, once you have done that, you can define those hosts as your name servers for the domain, just like you would if the name servers were run by someone else (like ZoneEdit).

 

Now, the full above process is only required for the domain the name servers reside in, i.e., example.com above. If you have another domain example2.com that you want to use the same name servers, you just define the name servers the host uses the way you did before, but with ns1 and ns2.example.com as the hosts.

 

The reason two domain name servers are required to be defined as a minimum is for redundancy. That way if one goes down, the other will still resolve names as if your name service is unavailable, nothing in your domain will work anymore even if those hosts are still up. The way this is often handled with low cost dedicated servers (the ones customers rent) that don't have the resources to set up multiple DNS servers is to use two IP addresses on the server and assign a nameserver to each one (in the registrar). Some registrars will even allow you to assign both DNS servers to the same IP address, but some won't. Most likely in your scenario, this will probably be what you want to do... if you can get two IP addresses on your windows server, then use both as name servers, just make sure your Windows DNS service is listening on both addresses (it's been awhile since I've used Windows DNS, so you'll have to look that part up, most likely by default, though, your Windows services will listen on all available interfaces unless you explicitly define otherwise). Just keep in mind, though, that if you do this, and your windows machine goes down, you will lose DNS service for your whole domain until the machine comes back up.

 

For better redundancy, and easier management, keeping your domain on ZoneEdit or a similar service is not a bad idea. Regardless, hopefully I made some sense here and this makes things a little bit more clear. If I just made things more confusing, let me know and I'll clarify.

Edited by TCH-MikeJ
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