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Perl And Php


kaseytraeger
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I'd like to know if it is possible to install Perl and PHP on my local machine (home computer). I want to work through a couple of tutorial books I've purchased, and it would be much easier to do this if they were both installed locally rather than having to do it via FTP or using cPanel's editor program.

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I have two machines. One is running Win2K and the other WinXP...

 

P.S. -- Glad to know that you're not that much of a smarty pants (or should I say smart arsed?) that you won't just say "yes" and leave it at that!

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*winks* I'm just toooooo nice, you see?

 

I've never done this. I believe you'll need to install apache (web server) as well - all in all it can be a real pain in the well, neck. =)

 

My best suggestion is to either wait for someone here with more experience or google install php on windows and install perl on windows - lots of results for both with instructions and a lot of research ahead of you to decide on the best implementations. =)

 

Sorry that I'm not more help =/

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You will have to use a webserver. Apache is the best choice.

Installing PHP is not that difficult.

Installing PErl I don't have experiences with.

When you go to the php and perl site you'll probably find windows binaries install versions. Installing is quite easy.

You will probably need more time to configure it all.

 

BUT. I was (still am to some extent) a dodo with installing this on my local server and I managed.. So.. there is still hope :)

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woesoft, you type really well for an extinct bird. =)

 

*nods* Apache is the best, by far, and is what TCH is using so that will be easiest to use to emulate the environment. Of course - we're on Linux and you're on windows so there are many differences, but every little bit counts? =)

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Lisa,

 

You got me on the extinct bird... As a dutchman i don't quite understand what that means. (Or maybe being a dutchman is what you mean?!?!)

 

Nowadays most install guides also offer installation notes for windows. But it's quite a hassle finding out if you have to use \ or / or ./ etc

 

Apache is indeed the best and not so difficult to install. Php is quite easy and perl (I guess i have it installed to is manageable..)

 

grtx,

Richard

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woe - I've woe.. erm,woefully sidetracked this thread. *shakes head* The dodo was a bird that is now extinct. Dutchmen are not extinct so.... I don't know what my point is. =)

 

Perl is probably harder to install, after all, perl scripts are harder to install... why should that change? But there are many different p ossibilities for which build and package to use. It gets pretty confusing and in the end I decided I personally didn't want to deal with it. Now that I'm on a Mac, though, it's all a bit easier... :)

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Lisa,

 

*banging head against the wall*

Forgot abt using dodo.. Now that I read it again I fully understand. Don't know why I didn't earlier. I know the meaning of extinct and I know the meaning of bird :)

Ah well... Must be the age...

I agree on perl and never used it so far.. I prefer php myself..

 

grtx,

Richard

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Kasey, as Lisa and Richard already said, you'll need to install a webserver to do what you want - assuming you want to make PERL and PHP scripts to run in webpages, which, from what you said, is the case (I say this because both PERL and PHP can be run without a webserver).

 

Well, anyway, get Apache, it's the best and it's simple to install. Get the 2.0.x version, it's much better than 1.3.x, especially since you're using Windows.

http://http.apache.org

 

As for PHP, get the ZIP package, not the installer, because the ZIP package comes with a bunch of extensions compiled in and a lot of stuff the installer doesn't bring. You can download it from http://php.net and read the instructions on how to install it here http://www.php.net/manual/en/installation.php - read the "Installation on Windows systems" and if you feel like it, the "Servers-Apache 2.0" chapters.

 

Finally, for PERL, get the binary from http://www.activestate.com/Products/ActivePerl/

Since I never developed with PERL on my Windows instalation, I have no idea of how to install it with Apache and I didn't find any good information on ActiveState's site. The only thing I found was this Instalation Guide:

http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/docs/ActivePerl/install.html

But through Google I found these nice instructions:

http://www.ricocheting.com/server/cgi.html

 

Well, that's it. I hope this helps. If you need anything more, you know where to post. :)

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Wow. Lots of commentary going on here!

 

Thanks for the helpful input. This is my first foray into anything like this, so I'll be taking it slowly, just one step at a time.

 

I do have a rather stupid/noob question *blushing sheepishly*. Can I set up an existing computer as a webserver? Or will I need to purchase a new machine to do that?

 

For example, I have two computers at home. One running Win2K and the other WinXP. Can I arbitrarily assign my Win2K machine as my webserver, install Apache, and <em>still</em> use it as a regular computer?

 

You know, I worked for 1.5 years in the IT department at Unisys. But I was only a student intern and was never involved in server management or administration, so from an IT standpoint, the job was useless to me ... (not that I was working there to gain an IT education mind you ... I'm just saying that even though I worked in the IT department, I didn't learn anything about IT.)

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As Bruce said, you can use the computer as a regular computer, there's no need for a dedicated machine :)

 

A webserver is just a computer. Depending on its role, it may need to be a more powerfull computer but that's just it. It's still a computer, you can still play games with it, you can still use office applications with it and you can still do whatever you do with your "regular" computer :)

 

The big difference between a "regular" computer and a webserver is that the webserver needs to have... well, a webserver installed and running :P

You see, the real webserver is the software, not the hardware, which is something most people don't realize. So just install the darn thing and go play with it already :P

 

Seriously, if you need any more help, just ask :)

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