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mountaindew

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About mountaindew

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  1. Counter

    Drop us a help ticket and i will get it fixed asap for you.
  2. Www.abc.com Vs Abc.com

    I looked and everything is ok on the server side. Most likely DNS
  3. Www.abc.com Vs Abc.com

    DNS issue. How long ago did you transfer the DNS?
  4. Path To Perl?

    yep, just please let us know when your DNS has proped :lol:
  5. Design Help

    Please explain? Your DNS tags? Masking - Where did you buy the domain name from? They are the ones that will handle masking or forwarding. Thanks
  6. MT Installation - mt-check.cgi

    Your on server6 and its all set now. Give it a shot! Oh, get some sleep!!!
  7. Signup Question

    The nameservers ns1 thru ns4 are for servers 1,2,3 & 4 Namservers ns5 & ns6 are for servers 5 , 6 and beyond. Since all your resold accounts are going to be on server 4 you can use any of the ns1 thru ns4
  8. Ftp.example.com Question

    Anon FTP is not possible on a shared IP. You would need a static IP address for this. Thanks
  9. Signup Question

    Hey Guys - Just be advised that we have 6 nameserver IP Address allocations. You will need to check you welcome email to determine which NameServer IP youve been assigned to. Turtle your on NS5 & NS6 Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving!
  10. Signup Question

    Hi, I am in Pontiac....
  11. Signup Question

    Turtle - Your account is live. Just wanted to let you know. Welcome to the ***** Family. oh and lstover thanks for the referral. Sunny Elliot is never wrong!
  12. Build Your Own Pc

    The Two-Fold Secret Patience and Plugs. There you have it, the two P's of Geek power. Be Patient and always remember, only Plug in the plugs that match. That last bit is the real key, and all kidding aside, if you remember that one simple fact when assembling a computer even you can build the Holy Grail of computers. Actually it isn't all that surprising if you think about it. The folks who make computers for a living need inexpensive labor. There is no reason why a computer should be difficult to build as long as you make the bits easy to assemble correctly, and that is exactly what hardware manufacturers have done. Let There Be Parts We won't presume to tell you in this article what kind of computer to build. You know what you want to do and what your budget will allow, so take your time and work out the best compromise of those two fundamentally conflicting factors. Depending on where you are in the world, you may not be able to walk in to a local discount computer parts store and choose the bits you need right off the shelf. Too bad. While mail (or Net) ordering parts is convenient, it has the singular disadvantage of not being able to ask questions of the resident local computer-shop-Geek. These Geeks can often help you sort out problems with your choices in hardware before you make your purchase. However, for the purposes of this article we will assume you have the parts you need to build a working computer. You will need a clean, quiet space about the size of your kitchen table with an electrical outlet nearby where you can work without interruption. The absolute minimum of tools you need are a non-magnetic Phillips screwdriver and perhaps a small pair of needle-nose pliers with insulated grips. If you plan on building computers from scratch repeatedly, doing this professionally, plan on repairing older computers, or are a tad clumsy, you might need a few more tools such as depicted here. Your hands must be clean and dry and you must remember the first commandment of working on electrical appliances: Thou Shalt Not Electrocute Thyself. The second commandment is almost as important: Thou Shalt Ground Thyself On The Chassis Before Touching Computer Parts. As you know, static electricity will destroy expensive computer bits in the blink of an eye. Each time you reach out to touch a computer part you should first ground yourself by touching the computer chassis before doing so. This is why it is important to work with the computer plugged in and grounded. The real trick to satisfying both the First and Second Commandments Of Computing is to plug the computer into a surge protector with the power turned off. This maintains the ground but reduces or eliminates the chance of shocking yourself. The third commandment is: Thou shalt not apply excessive force. Any time you insert a card or chip into a slot, be gentle. Push gently, rock the part back and forth a bit if necessary. If it just doesn't want to go in, it's probably either in the wrong slot or inserted the wrong way. Sometimes you have to push firmly, but using too much force can break things, so be careful. Let The Party Begin Start by taking inventory of your parts. Lay each part out on the table and look them over carefully. Make sure you have all manuals and printed material close by. If you have a second computer in the household with internet access you should locate the web sites of each of the manufacturers of the parts and bookmark them. PC911 has a great reference area if you need help finding some of these web sites. Basically, as a bare minimum, this is what you should have: A case suitable for the system board you will be using. The case is comprised of several parts. A steel chassis with a power supply in the inside back which should be rated at (at least) 250 Watts. The power supply will have a cooling fan. The power cord plugs into this power supply in the back of the cases. A case cover, usually metal, sometimes comprised of several panels, which will allow you to close the case once your work is done. There will be several screws which secure the cover(s) in place. Make sure they fit properly and that you understand how it goes together. It should assemble only one way and you should not have to bend or force it in place. The screw holes should line up so that you have no difficulty seating the screws. There may be several different sizes of screws. determine which are the correct ones for this purpose and set them aside. There should be a small bag of hardware with plastic parts, screws and some small (often brass) bolts which will act as supports for the system board. Review the contents of this bag of hardware. You will need a second and third case fan (often not included with a new case). The fan in the power supply will usually blow air out of the cases. Common practice is to have a second fan in the front of the cases sucking fresh, cool air into the case, and a third fan in the back right behind the CPU to blow warm air out of the case. Opinions differ on this last point but one thing is certain, your computer generates heat and you must provide a means to get it out of the box. For more information on cooling, check out the PC911 cooling tutorial. A system board, often called a "Mother board." Currently, the most common type of system board is an ATX Form Factor board, however, regardless of what you have, make sure that it will fit into the case and that the holes in the board line up with the screw holes in the base plate of the case. You must have a manual for the system board. If you do not have the correct manual for your specific model system board, STOP. You cannot assemble the computer without this manual. You should have a small bag with two or more ribbon type cables in it. These are: An IDE ribbon cable. A floppy drive ribbon cable. There may be a CD or floppy disk with drivers (software which "drives" the hardware). A CPU suitable for the system board you will be using. If you are unsure if the system board supports the particular CPU you have, read the manual. It will have a chart indicating which CPUs are supported and how the board should be set (jumpered) to accommodate your specific CPU. The CPU will require its own fan, usually sold separately. One or more RAM sticks of the correct type for your system board. Again, refer to the manual for the system board for details. A hard drive disk. Make sure you have enough space to grow. Generally you can expect about three to five years life from a hard drive so consider your possible computing needs well into the future. A 3½" floppy disk drive. A CD-ROM drive. Choose a 24x drive or better. Optionally, you could go with a good CD-R (CD recorder). A video adapter card. There are several types available these days. Make sure that the card you have will plug into one of the plugs (slots) in the system board. You will notice perhaps several different slots in the system board, but the video adapter will only plug into one, or one type of slot. A mouse with a suitable connector for your system board. Most common is a PS2 mouse which has a small round barrel jack. Refer to the manual for the location of the appropriate jack for the mouse. A keyboard, also with a suitable connector for the system board. Try plugging the keyboard and mouse into the system board to make sure you have compatible components. A monitor. These are the basic minimum essentials you must have in order to build a computer. However, there are many more items you may wish to use: A sound card. There is a huge assortment of cards available. If you decide to get a sound card you will also need shielded, computer speakers. A modem. We must surf! A Network Interface card (NIC) if you intend to set up a local area network (LAN). Also, for those of us lucky enough to have cable access to the internet this is a must. Techno-junky geeks could add hardware until the box bursts. We leave it to you to lust after the gizmo of your choice. Let the Assembly Begin: The Motherboard Start by removing the cover(s) from your case. Set the case so that the base plate, the part onto which you will attach the system board, is flat on the table. If it's a tower type case, lay it on it's side, if it's a desktop type case just set it on its "feet." Speaking of feet, look over that bag of parts; most new cases require that you snap in the little plastic feet. Now is a good time to do that. Before you go any further, take the system board and set it down into the case. Note that there are blanked off holes and slots in the back of the case which correspond with the various connectors that must plug into the system board itself, or the cards that will fit into it. If you have the room, be prepared to place the video adapter, sound card and whatever else you have as far apart as possible. Don't worry if you have to plug them in side by side but it sure makes it easier to work on the computer if you can get your fingers in between the cards. Remove the blanks for the holes you'll need once the computer is assembled. Some people prefer to remove all the blanks, so all the holes are open. This saves the trouble of doing so in the future if you decide to add new cards or parts and has the added benefit of allowing air to circulate in the case, improving cooling. Install the front and rear case fans if they didn't come pre-installed. Check that it will blow in the correct direction, which is usually indicated on the frame of the fan by a little printed arrow. For more information on cooling, check out our cooling tutorial. Now you know how all the parts will fit into place. Look through the hardware that came with the case. You should have a packet of small stand-off/spacer screws. These are usually brass, will thread into the case base plate and will support the system board. Screw them in place in the case and then set the system board down on them. You should now be able to use some small screws to fasten the system board in place. The screws will thread into the tops of the brass stand-off screws. Hopefully you got also some washers made from a non-conductive material, such as plastic, to use with the screws to absolutely eliminate the possibility of the metal head of the screw touching anything on the board it is not supposed to touch. If there are any screw holes left unsupported by the stand-off screws, look for plastic snap-in support grommets. These will snap into the remaining holes in the system board from underneath and help to support it. It is important to make sure the system board is well supported up, away from the metal case or it could short out. Once the system board is secure you can plug the long male connector from the power supply into the female plastic connector on the system board. Here is where you will see The Two-Fold Secret in action. The plug from the power supply will only plug in to one receptacle -- it will not fit any other connector. What's more, it will only fit one way. You can't plug it in backwards or upside down. Once plugged in your system board will have power to it so proceed with caution. Next you can plug the CPU in place. There are now several different types of CPU to system board sockets available. If you've shopped carefully and have the correct combination of board and CPU, and if you read the manual you will see that there is only one way to plug the CPU into the socket. Be patient and gentle. Look the CPU and socket over carefully before you assemble them. The RAM should be installed next. It should only fit one way. If you look carefully at the bottom of each RAM stick, you'll notice that there is a notch in it that makes it fit into the socket on the board only one possible direction. Again, be gentle, don't force it. Now you need to set the jumpers for the CPU and, if applicable, for the RAM. Look in the manual for the CPU setting charts. There will probably be (at least) four charts for four "banks", or sets of jumpers to control the CPU settings. Each of these must be correct in order for the computer to function properly. The jumper banks will likely be broken down as follows: The CPU I/O voltage. This is a general setting for whole families of CPUs. There will probably be one setting for all older CPUs and one for newer ones. Whatever the arrangement, the manual should spell it out clearly. The CPU/Bus speed. This is the multiplier for the CPU speed. You should have a chart in your manual with settings for X2.0, X3.0, X4.0, X4.5, etc. This setting works with the CPU clock speed (next item) to set the final CPU speed. The CPU clock. This setting controls the speed (MHz) at which the CPU functions. For example, a 400MHz Pentium II CPU should be jumpered at 100MHz with the BUS speed multiplier set to X4.0. Thus 100MHz X 4.0 = 400MHz. Or, if you have a 300MHz AMD CPU, the setting would be 75MHz X 4.0 = 300MHz. This figure is a close approximation of the actual CPU speed. When you hear a computer referred to as a e.g. "450 Celeron", this is what someone is talking about. The CPU core voltage. Every CPU has certain specific core voltage requirements. Many chips have this figure stamped directly onto the chip itself. If you can't find it there, look in the paperwork for the CPU. The manufacturers web page should also have this information available. Some motherboards don't have jumpers, though. They have something called SoftMenu, which means you boot the PC when you have all the parts installed, and carefully look on that first black screen for a message that reads something like "Press DEL to enter Setup." Check the motherboard manual for details how to enter the Setup menu, or BIOS. Then look in the BIOS for an entry called SoftMenu or CPU Menu. Here's where you set the clock and bus speed. The advantage of this is that you don't need to fiddle with those pesky little jumpers that have the nasty habit of jumping out of your fingers (that's why they are called jumpers - I think) into the smallest crevice available. Check the manual to see if your RAM requires any jumper settings. If so, just use the same methodical approach and you'll be fine. Now it's time to plug in the ribbon cables. Note: This article deals with IDE drives, since they are the most popular for the home user market. If you have SCSI devices in your setup, please check out our ultimate SCSI guide for details on how to easily install SCSI devices. These cables connect the different drives (floppy drive, CD-ROM and hard drives) to the system board. Each ribbon is 12, 18 or 24 inches long, and will have two or three connectors. Note that the floppy drive ribbon cable will only plug into the floppy drive because of its different size. You can't plug it into the hard drive or CD-ROM. Also, you'll see that it will only plug into one connector on the system board. Most system boards label the connector "Floppy" or similar, so there is no mistaking where it goes. The floppy cable stands out a bit because it has a funny twist towards one end. Plug the connector at the end after the twist into your floppy drive, this is what makes it drive A:. If you plugged it into the middle connector before the twist, it would become drive B:. The connector on the other end of the cable, away from the twist, goes into the floppy controller connector on the motherboard. Additionally, each of the connectors for these cables will only fit into their respective sockets one way. This is accomplished with a locating pin placed on one side of the connector or with asymmetrically shaped connectors. It might be possible to jam one of these connectors into the wrong socket but it wouldn't be easy to do (if you could do it at all) and you would almost certainly damage the connector in doing so. The Thin Red Line Nope, we're not talking about the sorry excuse for a movie with the same name, but about the most important clue on how to connect the ribbon cables correctly. Along one side of the ribbon cable (both floppy and hard drive) you'll notice a red stripe. This marks the side of Pin 1. On every hard drive and floppy drive and CD ROM drive you'll find a marking somewhere around, over, under, at, near the plug that shows you where Pin 1 is. Usually this marker is a tiny number 1 printed or an obvious arrow pointing. The same applies for the opposite connector on the motherboard. Line up the red line on the ribbon cable with the marker for Pin 1 and you're golden. Each of the ribbon cables will have either two or three plugs; one at either end and a third plug (optional) closer to one end than the other. The end of the ribbon cable with the lone connector is the side that plugs into the system board. This holds true for both the floppy and HDD/CD-ROM ribbon cables. The hard drive ribbon cable can plug into one of two connectors on the system board. Both connectors are for hard drive cables, but one of these is the Primary IDE connector and the other is the Secondary IDE connector. Each of these has a similar though specific function. Your system board will accommodate up to three separate individual hard drives along with one CD-ROM drive. All of these items plug into these IDE ribbon cables, however, there is a particular order in which these items are connected. For now though, let's finish assembling the system board in the case. Now look for a series of thin colored wires with small plugs coming from the inside front face of the case. These are the wires for the power switch, speaker, reset button, HDD light and fan in the front of the case. The little plugs will be labeled clearly. You will also notice that the plugs are notched, shaped asymmetrically and there will be a marking to indicate which is the number one pin. Now look at the corners of the system board for a series of little prongs sticking up. You'll know you've found them when you see the labels on the system board itself for the POWER SWITCH, FAN, SPEAKER, HDD (for the hard drive activity light) and POWER LED. They're usually all close together, bunched up in one corner of the main board. Note that the corresponding number one pins are labeled with a small triangular arrow head. They've made it basically foolproof. What with labels, specially shaped plugs and number one pin markers it's a straightforward job of plugging all those items in. You should consult your motherboard manual for some help with plugging these cables in. Any decent manual has a clear diagram explaining exactly which pins are for what and how to connect the cables to them. Also, keep in mind that you can't really do much wrong with these cables. After you are done assembling and turn the PC on, watch the lights on the front of the case and make sure the switches work. If they don't, simply turn it off, reverse the plugs for the item(s) that didn't work, and you should be in business. Let There Be Drives: Installing The CD-ROM, Floppy And Hard Drives Once the system board is in place and the floppy and IDE cable(s) and other wires are plugged into the system board you can install the various drives in the cases. Note where the cables will reach before you begin so you can plug everything in once you're finished. Here again, the arrangement is standardized. There are two different sized "bays" into which each of the various drives will fit. The smaller, 3½" bays are commonly used for your hard drive and floppy drive. The larger 5¼" bays will accept the CD-ROM and, when used with special brackets, will accommodate additional hard drives. Once you slide the drives into place you can easily see where the screw holes in the drive line up with slots in the case. All drives must be secured with four screws so that they cannot rattle about in the case. Once these are all in place you can begin to plug them in. Note: The following paragraphs explain the basics of connecting IDE drives. If you feel you need (or want) to know more about installing IDE drives, please check out our IDE drive installation article. There are several possible arrangements to configure your IDE drives, depending on how many devices you wish to connect: One Hard Drive - One CD-ROM Drive The Primary IDE cable will plug into the hard drive which will boot first. This is the C: drive. This hard drive will plug into the very end connector of the ribbon cable. This "boot" hard drive will have its jumpers set as "Master." These jumper settings can be found printed directly on the hard drive case. The Secondary IDE cable will plug into the CD-ROM. This Secondary IDE device, since by itself, will be jumpered as "Master" as well. The reason for this setup is that an IDE controller cannot multi-task, meaning transferring data from or to two devices at the same time. Therefore, by putting each device on its own controller, it will improve data transfer e.g. when installing from the CD-ROM to the hard drive because data can be transferred from the CD-ROM and to the hard drive at the same time since they each have their own controller. If they were on the same controller, it could do only one thing at a time and would have to wait until one transfer is complete, then switch and do the other one. This setup is also good when you have a CD-R (CD burner) because this arrangement will help to ensure that the data from the hard drive to be burned onto CD is being fed continuously to the burner. If the data stream gets interrupted, it could cause a buffer underrun, meaning you just produced a coaster. Two Hard Drives - One CD-ROM Drive The Primary IDE cable will plug into the hard drive which will boot first. This is the C: drive. This hard drive will plug into the very end connector of the ribbon cable. This "boot" hard drive will have its jumpers set as "Master." These jumper settings can be found printed directly on the hard drive case. The Secondary IDE cable will plug into the second hard drive, and CD-ROM drive. In this scenario, you 'll plug the cable into the second hard drive, which should be jumpered to "Master", and the CD-ROM drive, jumpered as "Slave." You can benefit from this setup after installing Windows by putting the Windows swap file onto this second hard drive, which will result in a small performance gain. For more information about the Windows swap file, check out our article on Managing the Swap File. Four IDE Devices Since each IDE channel can hold only two IDE devices and most motherboards come with two IDE controllers, this is the maximum amount of IDE devices you can have in a regular setup. With four IDE devices, the only choice you have is what device to connect to what channel. Follow the guidelines given above about putting the CD-ROM (or CD-R or DVD-ROM) on the secondary controller, and, if applicable, a second hard drive on the secondary IDE controller. Important: Some hard drives have different jumper settings, depending whether there is a second device present on the same channel or not. E.g. one IDE drive by itself on the Primary IDE channel would be jumpered as "Master only" or "Master without Slave present." But if there is a second device on the same channel, you might need to jumper it as "Master with Slave present." Consult the drive's manufacturer's web site for the necessary settings if they are not clearly printed on a sticker or marked otherwise on the drive. Note: Some newer motherboards offer now more than two IDE controllers, e.g. two additional DMA66 controllers, which lets you add more than 4 IDE devices. Or, if you're using SCSI in your system, then you obviously don't have to worry about above mentioned restrictions either. Let There Be Power Of course you need power to run this whole machinery - no juice, no fun. Look at that bundle of cables and connectors from the power supply. It has different shaped plugs. The biggest one, a massive 20-pin connector, supplies power to the motherboard. Consult the motherboard manual on how to connect this one, but it should be pretty obvious as there is only one socket that can accomodate this plug, and it is shaped so that it can only fit one way. The medium sized connectors are for your hard drives and CD drives. They also fit only one way and the socket for this plug is very obvious on the back of those devices. The smallest connector, of which there might be only one or two, are for floppy drives. Let There Be Light All that remains now is to install your video adapter card and any other cards you intend to use. The trick to these is to wiggle and rock them gently and firmly into place. Line up the metal tab with the slot in the back of the case and just start the card into the socket. Make sure you have everything lined up. Look it over carefully. Then, once you are comfortable that the card is ready to be seated you can begin applying pressure while you wiggle the card from side to side and rock it back and forth. Seat the card down into its connector completely and screw in the locating screw that attaches it to the back of the case, just above the slot. Repeat this process with each of the cards you intend to install. Let There Be Caution You've come this far. At this point you will probably be excited about what you've accomplished and anxious to get that puppy fired up. Not so fast there, chum. Stop and double-check yourself. Look very carefully at everything you've done. Is each connector and card fully seated and plugged in correctly? Visually inspect your handiwork. Take the opportunity to feel good about what you've accomplished so far. Once you feel confident that all is well you can begin to set it up for its first boot. By now you're so familiar with all the parts and their purpose that you need little guidance. Leave the covers off of the case for now; you may need to go back in to check some of your work or make adjustments if you didn't get one of the jumper settings right the first time. Plug the monitor into the video adapter and then the keyboard, mouse, and other peripherals into the correct ports. Of course, you'll need a bootable floppy disk for your favorite operating system. Plug it into the A: drive and hit the power switch. At this point, don't forget to go into the BIOS setup and make any necessary adjustments, if applicable. You've just built your own computer from scratch. Now that wasn't so difficult, was it? Now all you need to do is install the operating system. For some help with that, check out our article on Clean-installing Windows
  13. Windows Xp Services...

    XP services (what they do) Information, formatted into a forum friendly list of windows services and associated program name. This information will help you determine if you need a service running and if you want the service to access a network. Zonealarm asks if services.exe can access the internet!!!! Here you can find out what could be gaining access and why. Alerter services.exe ~ notifies users of administrative alerts. This service usually is not required under normal circumstances. Note: This is NOT "WinPopUp". Dependencies: Workstation Application Layer Gateway Service alg.exe ~ provides support for 3rd party plugins for Internet Connection Sharing/Internet Connection Firewall. This service is required if using Internet Connection Sharing / Internet Connection Firewall to connect to the internet. This uses about 1.5 MB of memory in an idle state. Application Management svchost.exe ~ used for Assign, Publish and Remove software services. If you cannot modify your software installation of certain applications, put this service in to Automatic or Manual. If you have Windows XP Home Version, this service may be causing problems described in this knowledge base article: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?...s;Q328213?SD=EE I have not tested this, but for now, Disable this service in Windows XP Home until installation of Service Pack 1. Automatic Updates svchost.exe ~ used to check up to see if there is any critical or otherwise updates available for download. You may choose to update manually due to the very long lag time from when an update is available and when Windows XP reports it. After the installation of Service Pack 1, you may configure how "often" updates are checked. Using default values, Windows XP "Automatically" downloads the updates and asks to "install" them. A few reasons why you may think this is unacceptable in your situation: You still have a dial-up connection. If XP feels like downloading whenever it wants, it just may not allow you to do what "you" want. Wish to know what, when and how an update installs BEFORE using any bandwidth. Want to read about the update BEFORE downloading. Want to know WHY you need it and WHAT it fixes. It is very important that if you decide to disable this service, you check the Windows Update site often to ensure the latest patches install properly. Take note: Manual (and Automatic) updates via Windows Update web site requires Cryptographic Services to be running. Place this service in to Automatic if you do not wish to update manually. Background Intelligent Transfer Service svchost.exe ~ used to transfer asynchronous data via http1.1 servers. According to Microsoft's site, Windows Update uses this "feature". It "continues" a download if you log off or shutdown the system (that is, when you log back in). The problem with that is, I do not like having this "feature" running all of the time. Even though I have found no side effects as to this being disabled, you may require this service for some MSN Explorer or Windows Messenger functions. Take note: Manual update via Windows Update web site requires Cryptographic Services to be running. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Workstation ClipBook clipsrv.exe ~ used to store information (cut / paste) and share it with other computers. I have never found enough need for this to allow this service to always be running. This service alone uses about 1.3 MB of memory. Dependencies: Network DDE COM+ Event System svchost.exe ~ you will receive, in the Event Log, an entry from "DCOM" complaining about not having this service running if disabled. I am unaware of any application that uses COM+, but if set to manual, many services report to it, so it will start anyway. This service is required for System Event Notification. For the fun of it: "C:\Program Files\ComPlus Applications\" On your system, see if you have any installed "COM+" Applications. If not, you can probably disable this service with no side effects (besides the Event Log complaining upon reboots). Take note: BootVis requires Task Scheduler and COM+ Event System to be running if you wish to take advantage of the "optimize system" function. Why is it required? It is due to the pre-fetching function built into Windows XP. Another Note: Pre-fetching only occurs on boot up and application start, so if you do not care about a few extra seconds of boot time, do not even bother with it and disable Task Scheduler. Windows Media Player may also require this service for some "features" to function. MS' .NET may require this service in the future. I recommend disabled for Super Tweaking, automatic for "safe", and manual for most other configurations. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) COM+ System Application dllhost.exe ~ you will receive, in the Event Log, an entry from "DCOM" complaining about not having this service running if disabled. I am unaware of any application that uses COM+, but if set to manual, many services report to it, so it will start anyway. For the fun of it: "C:\Program Files\ComPlus Applications" On your system, see if you have any installed "COM+" Applications. If not, you can probably disable this service with no side effects (besides the Event Log complaining upon reboots). This service is required for System Event Notification. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Computer Browser svchost.exe ~ maintains a listing of computers and resources located on the network. This service is not required on a standalone system. In fact, even if you what to browse the network (workgroup or domain) or have mapped network shares as local hard drives, you can still do so. On a large network, one computer is designated the "master" browser and another one is the "backup" browser. All others just announce they are available every 11 minutes to "take over" duties if one of the other computers fail. No lag time is discernable if this service remains disabled on all but one computer. Honestly, I do not even believe one needs to be running. You could, "just in case", but it sure does not need to be running on all computers. Dependencies: Server Workstation Cryptographic Services svchost.exe ~ mainly, it confirms signatures of Windows files. You may always get a dialog box complaining about uncertified drivers if this is disabled. This service is required for Windows Update to function in manual and automatic mode and this service is required to install Service Pack 1 unified updates. Windows Media Player may also require this service for some "features" to function. This service uses about 1.9 MB of memory. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) DHCP Client svchost.exe ~ receives a Dynamic IP address from your DHCP server and DNS updates. Required for ICS / internet client and if you run IPSEC, disable on a standalone system or one that has a static IP address. Take note: Most DSL/cable ISP's use DHCP to provide internet access. If you disable this service and your internet no longer works, place this back into automatic. Dependencies: AFD Networking Support Environment NetBios over TCP/IP TCP/IP Protocol Driver Distributed Link Tracking Client svchost.exe ~ maintains links with NTFS files within your computer or across a domain. For example, you make a file on "Computer A". You then create a "short cut" or "link" to that file on "Computer B". If you would move the file on Computer A to a different location, this service would tell Computer B to update its information to allow uninterrupted connectivity. Even though this is rather valuable on a large network, I have not found a use for this service. It uses about 3.5 MB to 4 MB in an idle state. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Distributed Transaction Coordinator msdtc.exe ~ takes care of transactions that span multiple resources. This service is required if using Message Queuing. You may also see complaints in the Event Log if this service is disabled, but I have experienced no side effects. Microsoft's .NET may require this service in the future. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Security Accounts Manager DNS Client svchost.exe ~ resolves and caches DNS names and Active Directory domain controller functions. This service is not required for DNS lookups, but if it makes you happy to have it running, you may. This service is required if using IPSEC. If you attempt to "repair" your network connection and a dialog box complains that the "DNS resolver failed to flush the cache", this service is the reason. If your computer connects to a network with a domain controller, you will be unable to connect to Active Directory with this service disabled. Dependencies: [*]TCP/IP Protocol Driver Error Reporting Service svchost.exe ~ calls home to Microsoft when application errors occur. I personally do not like this. I feel it is a waste of memory and resources. On the other hand, if you are experiencing system crashes often, the best way to deal with them is to report them using this tool. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Event Log services.exe ~ views Event Log messages from applications in Event Viewer. Always helpful to check out the Event Log to see what problems with applications are popping up that is "hidden" from the normal user. To see quickly what, if anything has resulted in your adjustments, you may consider clearing the Event Log. Windows Management Instrumentation also requires Event Log Service to be running. If you disable the Event Log Service, but do not disable Windows Management Instrumentation, your computer may have an extended boot time while Windows Management Instrumentation is waiting for the Event Log to start. It is just best to keep this service active. Fast User Switching Compatibility svchost.exe ~ unless you have many users on a system, you probably do not even need this service to be running. You could benefit, however, greatly if you use this service in conjunction with Remote Desktop. Dependencies: Terminal Services Fax Service fxssvc.exe ~ not installed by default, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. Dependencies: Plug and Play Print Spooler Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Telephony FTP Publishing Service inetinfo.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if you need it, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. This service provides a FTP server on your network. Dependencies: IIS Admin Help and Support svchost.exe ~ required for Microsoft's online help documents. If you ever "attempt" to use Help and Support, the service places itself back into "Automatic" and starts even if you already had this service on disabled. I try to avoid as much Microsoft help as I can... Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Human Interface Device Access svchost.exe ~ you may not have any peripherals that require this service. If one of yours magically does not function anymore, set it to automatic. Namely, scanners with function buttons (fax, copy) or even a keyboard with volume or play controls. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) IIS Admin iisadmin.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. This service usually operates in conjunction with a local web site or FTP server. Leave it uninstalled mainly because IIS has been "popular" for hackers to break. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Security Accounts Manager IMAPI CD-Burning COM Service imapi.exe ~ this service operates that cool "drag and drop" CD burn capability. You will need this service to burn CD's. What is the good news? If you set this service to manual, the service starts and stops itself when used with some software packages. This is practically the only service that does do this! If you still cannot burn a CD with it on manual, switch to automatic and feel safe that it starts only when "needed". This service may take up about 1.6 MB of memory in an idle state. Indexing Service cisvc.exe ~ this service always has been a major resource hog. I NEVER recommend having this service enabled. Remove the function via the "Add / Remove Programs" icon in the control panel (Windows Setup Programs). It uses about 500 K to 2 MB in an idle state, not to mention the amount of memory and CPU resources it takes to INDEX the drives. I have had people (and witnessed it on other people's computers) report to me that the Indexing Service sometimes starts up EVEN while the system is NOT idle... as in the middle of a game. You may feel, as I do, that this is unacceptable. If your computer suddenly seems "sluggish", this service is usually the cause of it. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Internet Connection Firewall and Internet Connection Sharing svchost.exe ~ used to allow multiple computers on your network to access the internet via only one account. This service installs on the "modem" computer. If you are using a third party firewall or Internet Connection Sharing software package, this service is not required. Dependencies: Application Layer Gateway Service Network Connections Network Location Awareness Remote Access Connection Manager IPSEC Services isass.exe ~ may be required on some domains, but the "average" user will not need this. Dependencies: IPSEC driver Remote Procedure Call (RPC) TCP/IP Protocol Driver Logical Disk Manager svchost.exe ~ this service is vital to run the Disk Management MMC console for dynamic volumes. If you attempt to "Manage" your hard drives and a dialog box pops up complaining about not being able to do this, start this service. Dependencies: Plug and Play Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Logical Disk Manager Administrative Service dmadmin.exe ~ this service is vital to run the Disk Management MMC console for dynamic volumes. Dependencies: Logical Disk Manager Plug and Play Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Message Queuing mqsvc.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if needed, you may install it later off of the Windows XP CD. May be used on some domains, but the "average" home user will never need this service. Dependencies: Distributed Transaction Coordinator Message Queuing access control NT LM Security Support Provider Reliable Multicast Protocol driver Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Server Message Queuing Triggers mqtgsvc.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. This service is required if you use Message Queuing service. Dependencies: Message Queuing Messenger services.exe ~ sends messages between clients and servers. This service needs not to be running under normal "home" conditions. It is also advisable to make this service go away to avoid the possibility of "net send" messages hitting your computer from the internet. This has nothing to do with MSN Messenger, nor is it "WinPopUp". To test for this security vulnerability, at the command prompt, (run: cmd.exe) type: net send 127.0.0.1 hi If you get a popup "hi" message, you should disable the Messenger service. If you get an error stating, "The message alias could not be found on the network", you are safe. If, for whatever reason, you need the Messenger service running but wish not to have spam popups active, you can disable the particular ports at your firewall. The Messenger service uses UDP ports 135, 137, and 138; TCP ports 135, 139, and 445. Dependencies: NetBIOS Interface Plug and Play Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Workstation MS Software Shadow Copy Provider dllhost.exe ~ used in conjunction with the Volume Shadow Copy service. Microsoft Backup uses these services. You will receive, in the Event Log, an entry complaining about not having this service running if disabled. I have yet to find a side effect, though. Some third party "ghost" or "imaging" software may require this service to be running. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Net Login isass.exe ~ used for logging onto a Domain Controller. This service is not required on a standalone system, or for a "home" network. You can find proof within the error event manager. Dependencies: [*]Workstation NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing mnmsrvc.exe ~ enables a user to access your computer using NetMeeting. This may create a BIG open door for the unwanted. If you are paranoid about security, disable this function. Even if you were not worried, I would still get rid of it. Network Connections svchost.exe ~ required for managing network connectivity. Set to disabled if you have NO network or you do not toy with the configurations a lot. If your internet connectivity no longer operates after disabling this function, set it back to Automatic! Note: While disabling this service, you will no longer see the system tray icon (lower right) displayed, even for modem connections. Connectivity, however, still exists even on incoming shared network drives. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Network DDE netdde.exe ~ I have not found a good use for this service. Unless you use remote ClipBook, disable it. This uses about 1.5 MB idle. Dependencies: Network DDE DSDM Network DDE DSDM netdde.exe ~ I have not found a good use for this service. Unless you use remote ClipBook, disable it. Dependencies: AFD Networking Support Environment TCP/IP Protocol Driver Network Location Awareness (NLA) svchost.exe ~ this service is required for use with the Internet Connection Sharing service (server only). NT LM Security Support Provider isass.exe ~ you do not need this service unless you are running Message Queuing or Telnet server. Performance Logs and Alerts smlogsvc.exe ~ collect performance data on a schedule and send the information to a log or trigger an alert. This may be a super geek tool, but I feel that the overhead associated with it is not worth the benefit. You decide. Plug and Play services.exe ~ this service is the heart and soul of the Plug and Play environment. I do not recommend disabling this service, but if you want to, you are on your own. Take note: UPnP is NOT PnP. UPnP is for connectivity on networks via TCP/IP to devices, such as scanners or printers. Your sound card is PnP. Do NOT disable Plug and Play service. Portable Media Serial Number svchost.exe ~ retrieves serial numbers from portable music players connected to your computer. I have not really found a good reason to keep this service always running. I am not aware of anything that actually requires it. Disable it unless something of yours ceases to function properly, such as Windows Media Player and Microsoft's integration with "Digital Rights Management". Print Spooler spoolsv.exe ~ queues up print jobs for later printing. This service is required if you have printers, even if they are network printers. If this does not fit your needs, disable it. You will save about 3.8 MB by making this service go away. Your printers will still be "installed" if you disable this service, but not visible in the printers folder. After restarting Print Spooler, they will reappear and be available for use. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Protected Storage isass.exe ~ allows for the saving of local passwords or even web sites information (AutoComplete). This service is set to Automatic by default. Due to security reasons, I recommend leaving this "feature" disabled to make things all that much more difficult to steal vital information if you do not "save" it. On the other hand, you may need this service to manage private keys for encryption purposes. If so, leave this service on automatic to ensure the "higher" security settings you choose work. If you disable this service, you will no longer have any of your passwords saved, no matter how many times you click the box. If you enjoy having your passwords saved in applications like Outlook or Dial up networking or you are connecting to the internet via a domain controller/server that requires authentication, set this service to Automatic. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) QoS RSVP rsvp.exe ~ provides traffic control on a network using IPSEC and applications that support QoS, and have an adapter that supports it. The QoS Packet Driver installs by default on any TCP/IP connections. I recommend uninstalling it if it is not needed on your network. As far as I can tell, you also need an ACS Server (Provided with Windows 2000 Server and Advanced Server) for the QoS Packet Scheduler and Applications to request the needed bandwidth. Since my network is not straining under any load, this is rather pointless. Take note: Some people (as I did before I completed extensive research on this) reported that QOS uses 20% of your bandwidth and does not allow any activity, regardless. This is false. For more information, please view this KB article from Microsoft (I normally do not post links to them, but this warrants it): http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?...b;EN-US;q316666 Regardless, if you uninstall the packet scheduler, no "bandwidth" is still reserved. Dependencies: AFD Networking Support Environment Remote Procedure Call (RPC) TCP/IP Protocol Driver Remote Access Auto Connection Manager svchost.exe ~ creates a connection to a network when a program requests a remote address. This service may be required for your internet connection. If things cease to function after disabling this service, put it to automatic. Note: you may require this service for some cable or DSL providers, depending on how they implement their logon process. If your Dial-up, cable or DSL internet access no longer functions properly with this service disabled, place this service into automatic. Dependencies: Remote Access Connection Manager Telephony Remote Access Connection Manager svchost.exe ~ creates a network connection. This service is required if you use Internet Connection Sharing. If things cease to function after disabling this service, put it to automatic. Note: you may require this service for some cable or DSL providers, depending on how they implement their logon process. If your Dial-up, cable or DSL internet access no longer functions properly with this service disabled, place this service into automatic. Dependencies: Telephony Remote Desktop Help Session Manager sessmgr.exe ~ manages and controls Remote Assistance. If you do not want or need to use this feature, disable it. In an idle state, this service sucks up 3.4 MB to 4 MB of RAM. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Remote Procedure Call (RPC) svchost.exe ~ this service is rather vital. Practically everything depends on this service to be running. This is also the only service that you cannot disable via the Services MMC. Previously, if you disabled this service in Windows 2000, your computer would become unbootable. What I am trying to tell you is leave this service on automatic and absolutely DO NOT disable it in msconfig. If, for whatever reason, the service became disabled and you can no longer boot your system, please read the information here for a way to fix it. Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator locator.exe ~ manages the RPC name service database. I have not found a reason to keep this service running. If something on your network breaks after you disable this service, put it back to manual. About 1.2 MB of RAM is in use with this service. Dependencies: Workstation Remote Registry Service svchost.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home. This is one of those not needed services. One of the first I disable. If you are paranoid about security, disable this service. Even if you are not or do not care, disable it anyway. Removable Storage svchost.exe ~ used for managing removable media. Disable this service if you do not have items like tape backup devices, etc. If your CD ROM / DVD drive starts acting funny, (no auto play, etc) place this service into automatic. Normally, this service does not need to be running and you will not miss any of its functionality. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) RIP Listener svchost.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. If you do not know what RIP is, you do not need this service installed. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Routing and Remote Access svchost.exe ~ allows computers to dial in to the local computer through a modem (or other devices) to access the local network using a standard or VPN connection. Unless you require this functionality, disable it for security reasons. Upon enabling this service, "Incoming Connections" icon will be available in the "Network Connections" control panel. Dependencies: NetBIOSGroup Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Secondary Logon svchost.exe ~ enables starting processes under alternate credentials. I have never found a reason to keep this service running. I have always considered "Alternate Credentials" someone other than me! Not my idea of fun... Really, though, it allows a "limited user" account to start an application or process with higher privileges, such as the Administrator account or another user. If you right-click a file, the menu will display "Run As" option. If you disable this service, that function will no longer be available. Security Accounts Manager isass.exe ~ like Protected Storage, it saves security information for local users. This service is required for IIS Admin. If you have ever used the Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) to modify your settings, you need to keep this service running; otherwise, your modifications will not apply. For "Safe" configurations, place this into automatic. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Server svchost.exe ~ used for file and print sharing from your computer or Message Queuing. For security purposes, you may disable this service if you do not require local printers and files shared across your network. Connectivity, however, still exists even on incoming shared network drives. Workstation needs to be running to connect to another computer that has the files you are looking for. Shell Hardware Detection svchost.exe ~ used for the auto play of devices like memory cards, CD drives, etc. Also, set to automatic if you are experiencing problems with laptop docking stations. In "My Computer", you may not see your hardware (example: DVD drive) displayed as a "DVD Drive" if this service is disabled. However, all functionality still exists. In addition, when checking the properties of an "auto play" device, such as a DVD drive, you will not have an auto play tab displayed or available. This allows the option of selecting what action you wish to take with a particular "type" of file. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) inetinfo.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. This service supports the use of a local (outbound) email server. Dependencies: Event Log IIS Admin Simple TCP/IP Services tcpsvcs.exe ~ this service does not install by default, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. This service supports some old school UNIX networking services. Dependencies: AFD Networking Support Environment Smart Card scardsvr.exe ~ supports the use of a Smart Card for local or network computer authentication. If you do not have a "Smart Card", or you do not know what a Smart Card is, you do not need this service running. Save the 1.1 MB to 1.4 MB of RAM this service uses. Dependencies: Plug and Play Smart Card Helper scardsvr.exe ~ supports the use of a Smart Card for local or network computer authentication. If you do not have a "Smart Card", you do not need this service running. SNMP Service snmp.exe ~ this service does not install by default, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. This service supports the use of networking equipment that uses SNMP as a mode of management. Dependencies: Event Log SNMP Trap Service snmptrap.exe ~ this service does not install by default, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. As above, this supports the use of networking equipment that uses SNMP as a mode of management. Dependencies: Event Log SSDP Discovery Service svchost.exe ~ used to locate UPnP devices on your home network. Used in conjunction with Universal Plug and Play Device Host, it detects and configures UPnP devices on your home network. For security reasons and for the fact that I doubt that you have any of these devices, disable this service. If any EXTERNAL device does not function because of this service being disabled, place it back in to automatic. Also, if you are experiencing difficulty connecting to multiplayer games that use DirectX7(, place this service to automatic and ensure you download all security updates. Take note: UPnP is NOT PnP. UPnP is for connectivity on networks via TCP/IP to devices, such as scanners or printers. Your sound card is PnP. Do NOT disable Plug and Play service. System Event Notification svchost.exe ~ used in conjunction with COM+ Event System, this service notifies particular services when system events, such as logon and power events occur. I doubt the average user really cares about this. I have also not seen any applications that use this. You will receive, in the Event Log, an entry complaining about not having this service running if disabled. I have yet to find a side effect, though. Dependencies: COM+ Event System System Restore Service svchost.exe ~ read all of this. This service creates system snap shots or restores a point for returning to later. This is the OTHER service that is a massive resource hog. Indexing Service is number one. Every time you install a program or new driver, and on a schedule, this service creates a "restore point" to roll back to if a problem occurs. This service would have been nice in the Windows 95 days due to plenty of problems occurring (new DirectX version every 15 minutes) but not required for the "much" more stable Windows XP. This is the FIRST thing that I get rid of on a clean installation. I feel it is faster and less hassle to just install clean. A rather GOOD (and possibly the only) reason to use this "feature" is to roll back your OS after installing an unknown program or testing software. For example, if you use BETA software of any kind. NOTE: If you disable this service, your previous "restore points" will delete. If, for whatever reason, you do not want this to happen, do not disable this service. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Task Scheduler svchost.exe ~ you use this service to schedule maintenance, Microsoft Backup sessions, or maybe even Auto Update. I do everything manually, to avoid having this service running all the time. Some third party software may require this service to be active for automated functions, such as virus scanners, system maintenance tools, and automatic patch/driver lookups. Take note: BootVis requires Task Scheduler and COM+ Event System to be running if you wish to take advantage of the "optimize system" function. Why may you need this service? It is due to the pre-fetching function built into Windows XP. Another Note: Pre-fetching only occurs on boot up and application start, so if you do not care about a few extra seconds of boot time, do not even bother with it and disable Task Scheduler. On some applications, the pre-fetching feature really does help. Only you can decide whether to use its functionality. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper Service svchost.exe ~ this feature provides legacy support for NetBios over TCP/IP. If your network does not use NetBios and / or WINS, disable this function. Dependencies: AFD Networking Support Environment NetBios over TCP/IP TCP/IP Printer Server tcpsvcs.exe ~ this service does not install by default, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. Used for setting up a local UNIX print server. If you do not need this function, leave it uninstalled. Dependencies: Print Spooler TCP/IP Protocol Driver Telephony svchost.exe ~ controls telephony devices on the local computer. This service is required for dial-up modem connectivity. Note: you may require this service for some cable or DSL providers, depending on how they implement their logon process or some AOL functionality, depending on software used. If Dial-up, cable or DSL internet access no longer functions properly with this service disabled, place it into automatic. Dependencies: Plug and Play Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Telnet tintsvr.exe ~ this services is not available on Windows XP Home. It allows remote login to the local computer via the telnet function. For security reasons, disable this unless you specifically require its functionality. You will save about 2 MB of RAM by plugging this security hole. Dependencies: NT LM Security Support Provider Remote Procedure Call (RPC) TCP/IP Protocol Driver Terminal Services svchost.exe ~ allows remote login to the local computer. This service is required for Fast User Switching, Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance. You will not be able to view who is logged on to a particular computer by viewing the "user" tab located in the Task Manager if this service is disabled. For security reasons, disable this unless you specifically require its functionality. For some reason, start this service to install Norton 2003. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Themes svchost.exe ~ used to display all those new XP themes and colors on your desktop. If memory conscious and does not care about the "new" XP look, disable this service to save RAM. I have observed between 4MB to 12MB of RAM used for the new themes. Previous Page | System Configurations Uninterruptible Power Supply[/size][/color][/b] ~ I have not found a need for this. My UPS that connects via USB does NOT need this service to run. Windows Update also has a "patch" for this service. Some UPS connected via serial port may require this service to be running. Universal Plug and Play Device Host svchost.exe ~ used in conjunction with SSDP Discovery Service,it detects and configures UPnP devices on your home network. For security reasons and for the fact that I doubt that you have any of these devices, disable this service. If any EXTERNAL device does not function because of this service being disabled, place it back in to automatic. Also, if you are experiencing difficulty connecting to multiplayer games that use DirectX7(, place this service to automatic and ensure you download all security updates. Furthermore, if you useInternet Connection Sharing and wish to make use of the "allow others to modify this connection" feature, enable UPnP. Take note: UPnP is NOT PnP. UPnP is for connectivity on networks via TCP/IP to devices, such as scanners or printers. Your sound card is PnP. Do NOT disable Plug and Play service. Dependencies: SSDP Discovery Service Upload Manager svchost.exe ~ as with BITS, this service manages file transfers between clients and servers on the network. This service is NOT required for basic File and Print sharing. I have yet to find a need for this service. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Volume Shadow Copy vssvc.exe ~ used in conjunction with the MS Software Shadow Copy Provider service. Microsoft Backup also uses these services. You will receive, in the Event Log, an entry complaining about not having this service running if disabled. I have yet to find a side effect, though. If you do not like the errors, place it in manual. By taking it out of automatic, you will save about 3.0 MB of memory. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) WebClient svchost.exe ~ I have not found a reason to have this service running. I have a hunch that this is going to be required for Microsoft's "Dot Net Software as a service" crap. For security reasons, I recommend for this service to be disabled. If some MS products, such as MSN Explorer, Media Player or Messenger fail to provide a particular function, try to enable this service to see if it is "required" for your configuration. Dependencies: WebDav Client Redirector Windows Audio svchost.exe ~ this service is required if you wish to hear any audio at all. If your computer does not have a sound card, disable this service. Dependencies: Plug and Play Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) svchost.exe ~ used for some scanners, web cams, and cameras. If, after disabling this service, your scanner or camera fails to function properly, enable this service by placing it into automatic. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Windows Installer msiexec.exe ~ this service is required for software applications that install using MSI files. If no applications that you have will install properly or you get an error that involves "RPC Service", place this service in to Automatic or Manual. Only disable this service after you have completed installation of your applications, mainly Office and such. I am not aware how many Games actually use MSI Files. In an idle state, this service uses about 3.4 MB of RAM. Put it to manual to save that amount. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Windows Management Instrumentation svchost.exe ~ this service is required if you want to see the "Dependencies" tab in service configuration and you want everything to go smoothly. I do not recommend disabling this service as strange things may start to happen. Dependencies: Event Log Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extension svchost.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home. This service is not as vital as Windows Management Instrumentation, but I recommend leaving this service in manual. Windows Time svchost.exe ~ automatically sets your clock by contacting a server (Microsoft's server by default) on the internet. Great idea if your network connects to the internet 24/7. The Event Log fills up with "cannot find server" messages on a non-dedicated setup, though. After successful synchronizing, this service will not attempt to do it again for 7 days, meanwhile, taking up resources. You may also need Task Scheduler running. I set my clock manually. Wireless Zero Configuration svchost.exe ~ provides automatic configuration for wireless network devices. If you do not have any wireless network devices in use, disable this service. Dependencies: NDIS Usermode I/O Protocol Remote Procedure Call (RPC) WMI Performance Adapter wmiapsrv.exe ~ I have not found a use for this service. Save the 2.5 MB to 6 MB of memory, this service consumes. Dependencies: Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Workstation svchost.exe ~ used to connect local computer to remote computers. Examples may include Internet connectivity and local File and Print sharing. Many services depend on Workstation to be functioning. Leave it on automatic. World Wide Web Publishing Service inetinfo.exe ~ this feature is not available on Windows XP Home or installed by default on Windows XP Pro, but if needed, you may install it later off the Windows XP CD. Used for setting up a local web server. If you do not need this function, leave it uninstalled, mainly because this service requires IIS Admin to be running and IIS has been "popular" for hackers to break. Dependencies: IIS Admin
  14. Upload Problems

    Well we made it. Im glad for two things. Mostly im glad you got it figured out. But im also glad it was on your end and not our server side. Welcome to the ***** Family sbpa!!! dew -
  15. Cgi Running Before Domain Gets Transferred?

    Hi - To see if the guys will install it submit a help desk ticket. Happy Holidays!
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