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leezard

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About leezard

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  1. Ftp Extension

    whats the URL to the site having the problems?
  2. Aol Im

    ok i lied, its down again
  3. Please Help!

    none of the google results have helped, thats where i have gotten all the fixes i already posted.
  4. Please Help!

    I'll keep looking around, Its not like i have anything else to do at the moment
  5. Aol Im

    AIM seems to be back online
  6. Aol Im

    No wonder mu AIM was so quiet lol, It was still showing i was logged on.
  7. Please Help!

    the problem is, this is a variant of another viruse, there is a sobig.a,b,c,d,e and now f. So, the fixes for earlier versions may not work on this current version.
  8. Please Help!

    try this http://www.trendmicro.com/download/tsc.asp if you dont have a trend micro product you want to download the Trend Micro System Cleaner Package.
  9. Word Game!

    card
  10. Word Game!

    donald (duck)
  11. Coupleof New Virus

    While looking for a fix to mwtars virus i found some info on a couple of new ones. The BEST way to protect yourself vrom a virus is dont poen anything that your not sure where it came from, opening attachments that you are unsure of is like opening your front door and letting the burglar in. On Monday, another worm surfaced that was written to remove Blaster from infected computers and patch the hole. That worm, dubbed "Welchia" or "Nachi," was temporarily paralyzing many corporate networks, experts reported. In addition, an e-mail hoax was circulating, purporting to be a patch from Microsoft for the security hole Blaster exploits. But the e-mail instead contains a Trojan application that installs itself on the computer as a back door enabling an attacker remote access to the system.
  12. Please Help!

    1. Disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP). 2. Update the virus definitions. 3. Do one of the following: * Windows 95/98/Me: Restart the computer in Safe mode. * Windows NT/2000/XP: End the Trojan process. 4. Run a full system scan and delete all the files detected as W32.Sobig.F@mm. 5. Delete the values that were added to the registry. For specific details on each of these steps, read the following instructions. 1. Disabling System Restore (Windows Me/XP) If you are running Windows Me or Windows XP, we recommend that you temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows Me/XP uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the computer. Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations. Also, a virus scan may detect a threat in the System Restore folder even though you have removed the threat. For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows documentation, or one of the following articles: * "How to disable or enable Windows Me System Restore" * "How to turn off or turn on Windows XP System Restore" 2. Updating the virus definitions Symantec Security Response fully tests all the virus definitions for quality assurance before they are posted to our servers. There are two ways to obtain the most recent virus definitions: * Running LiveUpdate, which is the easiest way to obtain virus definitions: These virus definitions are posted to the LiveUpdate servers once each week (usually on Wednesdays), unless there is a major virus outbreak. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by LiveUpdate, refer to the Virus Definitions (LiveUpdate). * Downloading the definitions using the Intelligent Updater: The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are posted on U.S. business days (Monday through Friday). You should download the definitions from the Symantec Security Response Web site and manually install them. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by the Intelligent Updater, refer to the Virus Definitions (Intelligent Updater). The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are available: Read "How to update virus definition files using the Intelligent Updater" for detailed instructions. 3. Restarting the computer in Safe mode or ending the Trojan process Windows 95/98/Me Restart the computer in Safe mode. All the Windows 32-bit operating systems, except for Windows NT, can be restarted in Safe mode. For instructions, read the document, "How to start the computer in Safe Mode." Windows NT/2000/XP To end the Trojan process: 1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete once. 2. Click Task Manager. 3. Click the Processes tab. 4. Double-click the Image Name column header to alphabetically sort the processes. 5. Scroll through the list and look for Winppr32.exe. 6. If you find the file, click it, and then click End Process. 7. Exit the Task Manager. 4. Scanning for and deleting the infected files 1. Start your Symantec antivirus program and make sure that it is configured to scan all the files. * For Norton AntiVirus consumer products: Read the document, "How to configure Norton AntiVirus to scan all files." * For Symantec AntiVirus Enterprise products: Read the document, "How to verify that a Symantec Corporate antivirus product is set to scan all files." 2. Run a full system scan. 3. If any files are detected as infected with W32.Sobig.F@mm, click Delete. 5. Deleting the values from the registry CAUTION: Symantec strongly recommends that you back up the registry before making any changes to it. Incorrect changes to the registry can result in permanent data loss or corrupted files. Modify the specified keys only. Read the document, "How to make a backup of the Windows registry," for instructions. 1. Click Start, and then click Run. (The Run dialog box appears.) 2. Type regedit Then click OK. (The Registry Editor opens.) 3. Navigate to the key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run 4. In the right pane, delete the value: "TrayX"="%Windir%\winppr32.exe /sinc" 5. Exit the Registry Editor.
  13. Please Help!

    Heres a link to the removal tool Removal tool Removal using the W32.Mimail.A@mm Removal Tool Symantec Security Response has created a tool to remove W32.Mimail.A@mm, which is the easiest way to remove this threat. Manual Removal As an alternative to using the removal tool, you can manually remove this threat. The following instructions pertain to all current and recent Symantec antivirus products, including the Symantec AntiVirus and Norton AntiVirus product lines. 1. Disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP). 2. Update the virus definitions. 3. Run a full system scan and delete all the files detected as W32.Mimail.A@mm. 4. Delete the value that was added to the registry. For specific details on each of these steps, read the following instructions. 1. Disabling System Restore (Windows Me/XP) If you are running Windows Me or Windows XP, we recommend that you temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows Me/XP uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the computer. Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations. Also, a virus scan may detect a threat in the System Restore folder even though you have removed the threat. For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows documentation, or one of the following articles: * "How to disable or enable Windows Me System Restore" * "How to turn off or turn on Windows XP System Restore" For additional information, and an alternative to disabling Windows Me System Restore, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article, "Antivirus Tools Cannot Clean Infected Files in the _Restore Folder," Article ID: Q263455. 2. Updating the virus definitions Symantec Security Response fully tests all the virus definitions for quality assurance before they are posted to our servers. There are two ways to obtain the most recent virus definitions: * Running LiveUpdate, which is the easiest way to obtain virus definitions: These virus definitions are posted to the LiveUpdate servers once each week (usually on Wednesdays), unless there is a major virus outbreak. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by LiveUpdate, refer to the Virus Definitions (LiveUpdate). * Downloading the definitions using the Intelligent Updater: The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are posted on U.S. business days (Monday through Friday). You should download the definitions from the Symantec Security Response Web site and manually install them. To determine whether definitions for this threat are available by the Intelligent Updater, refer to the Virus Definitions (Intelligent Updater). The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are available: Read "How to update virus definition files using the Intelligent Updater" for detailed instructions. 3. Scanning for and deleting the infected files 1. Start your Symantec antivirus program and make sure that it is configured to scan all the files. * For Norton AntiVirus consumer products: Read the document, "How to configure Norton AntiVirus to scan all files." * For Symantec AntiVirus Enterprise products: Read the document, "How to verify that a Symantec Corporate antivirus product is set to scan all files." 2. Run a full system scan. 3. If any files are detected as infected with W32.Mimail.A@mm, click Delete. 4. Deleting the value from the registry CAUTION: Symantec strongly recommends that you back up the registry before making any changes to it. Incorrect changes to the registry can result in permanent data loss or corrupted files. Modify the specified keys only. Read the document, "How to make a backup of the Windows registry," for instructions. 1. Click Start, and then click Run. (The Run dialog box appears.) 2. Type regedit Then click OK. (The Registry Editor opens.) 3. Navigate to the key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run 4. In the right pane, delete the value: "VideoDriver"="%Windir%\videodrv.exe" 5. Exit the Registry Editor.
  14. Please Help!

    Heres info on the virus, gimme a minute and I'll find out how to get rid of it. Disguised worm evades antivirus software From Marsha Walton CNN Saturday, August 2, 2003 Posted: 12:53 AM EDT (0453 GMT) Here's what users would see in the e-mail carrying the worm: Subject: your account <account info> Body: Hello there, I would like to inform you about important information regarding your email address. This email address will be expiring. Please read attachment for details. --- Best regards, Administrator Attachment: message.zip ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) -- Computer experts have warned of a computer worm that takes advantage of a flaw in Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser. The latest problem is called "worm/MiMail.A," also known as W32.Mimail.A@mm. It's a mass-mailing Internet worm that started spreading late Friday afternoon, and according to Central Command, a computer security company, caught many computer systems administrators by surprise. "Most corporations have e-mail scanning programs that block the entry of a lot of potentially dangerous programs in incoming e-mails," said Steven Sundermeier of Central Command. But this worm disguises itself by arriving as a zip file, he said, which most scanning programs allow. A zip file is usually a method of condensing information so it can move faster over the Internet. If a user clicks on the attachment, the worm is launched and creates a mass-mailing of itself, which may clog mail servers or degrade network performance.
  15. Winmail.dat

    It's a Microsoft Exchange "feature". Since Exchange supports rich-text email (bold, italic, multiple fonts, etc.), and Internet email doesn't, any email sent from Exchange to a non-Exchange mail reader will contain an Attachment called WINMAIL.DAT. If you use Exchange, you won't see this file, and the message will retain its formatting. However, it can be confusing for those who don't use Exchange (You, I, and the majority of the Internet population), and have no use for this file. In MS Outlook and Outlook Express: On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Mail Format (or "Send") tab. Under the Send tab is the message format list, select Plain Text or HTML(NOT Rich Text Format), and then click OK.
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